Uncategorized

Richard Mosse’s “Infra”

Published on October 22nd, 2012

Developed first during World War II for spotting camouflage in surveillance photographs, and later used by hippies in the 60′s for album covers, color infrared film has fallen by the wayside now a days. At roughly $50 a 35mm roll, and the chemicals to develop it being even more expensive, it’s not exactly the most practical film to shoot.

Regardless of this, Richard Mosse loaded up and headed to the Congo, using it’s unique look to depict the failed humanitarian effort happening there. It’s aesthetic brings new meaning to photographs of it’s people as well as environment. The bright pinks and reds add almost a caricaturistic look to hardened jungle soldiers, and a light hearted sensibility to what would normally be dark and intimidating jungle landscapes. This intentional misrepresentation causes the viewer to reflect more on the situations happening in the photographs. It’s easy enough to become desensitized to photographs of child soldiers, but when shown in a spectrum of light unseen to the human eye we take a second look.

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

RichardMosse.jpg

Richard Mosse, Infra, Jack Shainman Gallery NY from Jack Shainman Gallery on Vimeo.

See more of Mosse’s work here

Comments

Reply

Comment guidelines, edit this message in your Wordpress admin panel